STCW Dialogue in Cebu presents clear message to stakeholders

Cebu STCW Dialogue | 31 March 2016THE MARITIME Industry Authority (MARINA) will implement full compliance with STCW standards set in the Manila Amendments by January 1, 2017 — a clear message sent out during a dialogue dubbed “Usapang STCW (Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers) Forum” in Cebu to maritime stakeholders: shipping and manning agencies; maritime higher education institutions (MHEIs); maritime training institutions (MTIs); maritime assessment centers (MACs); maritime training centers (MTCs); maritime students and seafarers.

“Seafarers must not slack over their updating or refresher courses; they need to take it immediately in order to abide by the requirements set by the Convention in the Manila Amendments, as it is an international standard put in place by the International Maritime Organization in 2010,” stresses Atty. Jabeth Sena Jepath A. Dacanay, Deputy Executive Director of the MARINA STCW Office, and one of the panelists in the dialogue. She likewise enjoins the support of both manning and shipping agencies to require their seafarers to undergo the needed refresher or updating courses before the deadline.

Cebu STCW Dialogue | 31 March 2016

“Flocking to the MARINA offices on the eleventh hour will be a major remiss on your part as MARINA might not be able to accommodate the influx, should that scenario take place,” Atty. Dacanay says further.

“As with the maritime colleges and training centers, the courses they provide must also be compliant with the requirements of the Convention to assure foreign principals that our seafarers are aligned with the skills and proficiency preconditions the international maritime shipping industry demands,” Atty. Dacanay explains.

Cebu STCW Dialogue | 31 March 2016

The dialogue kicks off with a presentation by Atty. Herschel F. Magracia of the historical background that marked the urgent need for a single maritime administration accountable for the standards of training, certification, and watchkeeping duties of seafarers, including, together with CHED (Commission on Higher Education), the monitoring and assessment of maritime higher education institutions, training centers and institutions, assessment centers and their trainers. Atty. Magracia is Director of the MARINA Enforcement Service and Officer-in-Charge of the MARINA STCW Office Legal Division.

Usapang STCW is a regular weekly dialogue, every Thursday, between the STCW Office and stakeholders in venues held nationwide. It is a forum where questions are answered and other updates and relevant information are shared.

The “Usapang STCW Forum” was held at the Convention Hall of the Sacred Heart Center in Cebu City, March 31, 2016, 9:30 AM.

 

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Open registry for ships is a viable option — Atty. Pia

On Philippine Ship RegistryThe MARINA lawyers group convened to set in place a congressional agenda regarding concerns on the Philippine ship registry. Presiding over the group, Atty. Gloria Victoria-Bañas tasked all lawyers to actively participate in the said undertaking so as to provide strength and support to a drafted bill on the Maritime Code. Atty. Victoria-Bañas also stressed the need to focus on promoting the flag and to present a more attractive registry to diffuse the alarming rate of ships flagging out.

The MARINA, in undertaking measures to address the declining rate of ship registry, has recently amended MARINA Memorandum Circular No. 182 or the “Rules in the Acquisition of Ships under Presidential Decree 760, as amended, and providing herewith the Implementing Rules under Chapter XV of the 1997 Philippine Merchant Marine Rules and Regulations (PMMRR) on Registration, Documentation, Licensing of Ships for International Voyages” by providing simplified requirements and rules rationalized for ships registered under the Philippine flag.

MARINA Lawyers on the Philippine Ship Registry

According to the latest data of MARINA, the Philippine Ship Registry continuously declines. Since 1988, the Philippine ship registry has dropped to present level of 25% to 117 of what used to be 467.

Theory and practice expert and resource speaker Professor Proshanto K. Mukherjee was invited last February to a Seminar and Workshop on International Ship Registries to discuss the different kinds of ship registration system and the legal and practical implications of each.

Taking breadth from said seminar and workshop, the lawyers group take the lead in reviewing maritime laws and ship registries. The Overseas Shipping Service, meanwhile, will act as support group. This initial MARINA all-lawyers meet took place on March 22 at the MARINA Boardroom.

MARINA Lawyers on the Philippine Ship Registry

 

MARINA technical personnel attend intensive design, construction training

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“We are primarily a sea-going people; we move a lot and do business using inter-island transport systems, even during our ancestors’ days,” Shipyards Regulation Service (SRS) Director Engr. Ramon C. Hernandez said.

“As part of MARINA’s thrust of promoting a culture of safety at sea, we have conducted studies on the level of safety traditional wooden-hulled vessels provide. The result prompted us to look for alternative and better materials and systems that will prevent accidents during sea transport,” Engr. Hernandez explained.

The study focused on safety levels of wooden-hulled vessels resulted to a gradual phase out of vessels still using wood as its hull, and is part of the mandatory Vessel Retirement Program in the revised implementing rules and regulations of Republic Act 9295, “An Act promoting the development of Philippine domestic shipping, shipbuilding, and ship repair and ship breaking, ordaining reforms in government policies towards shipping in the Philippines, and for other purposes,“ Rule IX, Section 23 – Retirement of Old Vessels.

“Although the materials for alternative hulls like fiberglass are a bit costlier than wood, the safety of FRP boats far outweigh the cost,” Engr. Hernandez added.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

The use of alternative materials for boat design and construction with proven higher safety levels is advantageous to both ship owner or operator and the public that relies on sea transport to get on with their businesses.

The training was formally opened with an invocation from Engr. Maria Teresa D. Mamisao from MARINA-SRS. Engr. Hernandez gave his welcome message and introduced the lecturers. Meanwhile, Atty. Gloria Victoria-Bañas imparted inspiration and appreciation to attendees and partners who made the event possible.

Presented during the training were different kinds of fiberglass materials, the processes on boat-building using fiberglass materials, scantling calculations of FRP boats, assembly of hull and deck, installation of outboard engine and accessories, and how to repair FRP boats. Workshop activities on actual FRP boat-building provided hands-on experience for the MARINA technical personnel. The three-day intensive training took place at the ALS Marine Boat Factory in Brgy. Calibuyo, Tanza, Cavite. The event was a partnership effort of MARINA with the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) through Mr. Tomoyuki Fukuhara, its expert on Maritime Safety Policy and Maritime Industry Modernization; the ALS Marine Center Corp; and the Yamaha Motor Co. Ltd.

Photos during the training are shown below.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

Training on the Design & Construction of Boats Using Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic, March 16 to 18, 2016.

 

 

Enforcement Service sets out safety campaign

The MARINA Enforcement Service (ES) sets out an educational campaign on safety at sea among sea-going passengers, including ship owners and operators, traversing inter-island routes. With printed brochures and internet-published materials, the campaign is expected to reach a wide range of sea travelers. The material, divided into three parts, features basic safety information for ship passengers, ship owners’ and operators’ basic responsibilities, and the common violations and penalties for the public to be aware of.

Ligtas Biyaheng Dagat e-Campaign (downloadable, mobile-friendly PDF version)

“Instilling a culture of safety in the minds of the public that travels by sea, through inter-island sea transport facilities is a good start,” Atty. Herschel F. Magracia explains. Also, he adds, “knowing what must be done can now initiate and cultivate a habit of making sure that everything is safe, sound and secure.”

Ligtas Biyaheng Dagat e-Campaign (mobile-responsive web version)

“A culture of safety is one of MARINA’s major thrusts as it involves everyone within the scope of such a seemingly simple activity of transporting people, goods, and cargoes yet it engages an intricate and interlaced web of systems and policies among regulators, enforcers, business managers, shippers, owners, operators, and so on, to the public at large,” says MARINA Administrator Dr. Maximo Mejia Jr.

The campaign is all-year round and reminders need to be hammered down prior school breaks or holidays — the time when most of our fellowmen plan to travel the seas. The material is prepared in Filipino and the “Violations and Penalties” section are presented in English.

Maligayang Pasko at Manigong Bagong Taon!

Gloria-in-excelsis-Deo_card

 

 

 

STCWO’s year-end management assessment meet closes with a pledge for improved service

A pledge for improved service to meet seafarers’ demands is not a far cry from raising the bar for next year’s eventualities. The Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers Office (STCWO) continues to gear up to full implementation by 2017. This according to STCWO Executive Director Capt. Herminio P. Estaniel Jr as he closes the two-day year-end management assessment meet in the afternoon of 12 December 2015 at the Camayan Beach Resort and Hotel in Subic.

STCWO year-end management assessment meet at Subic

Estaniel recognizes the contribution of everyone in the STCWO and identifies milestones met during the year. These successes include: the efforts undertaken with the results of the EMSA (European Maritime Safety Agency) Audit in 2014; the incorporation of the standards of training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers with the Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA) through Republic Act 10635; the ISO 9001:2008 certification; publishing of MARINA circulars on rulings for maritime training institutions and maritime higher education institutions and circulars on regulatory advise for STCW-compliant courses; the incorporation of the MARINA board of examiners; the (Commission on Higher Education) CHED-MARINA joint agreement on the white listing of maritime institutions with deficiencies; and the major transfer of the functions of the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) and the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC).

Other achievements cited are: the constitution of the twelve divisions under the STCW Office; the constitution of the Monitoring, Evaluation and Technical Support Services (METSS) and Ratings Board; and the devolution of certification to regions. Estaniel also mentions the strengths achieved with capacity building and enhancement activities and efforts for information drives.

As part of the assessment meet, Estaniel appeals for a more practicable and analytical approach to high profile pressing issues and concerns in areas of: office systems infrastructure; the quantity and qualifications of personnel; contingencies for all possible scenarios; identification of key performance indicators and realistic goal-setting; the volume of seafarers who are still without 2010 STCW Manila Amendments certifications, and other such items discussed under the maximization of services in support systems.

He lays down key expectations in 2016 for the STCWO starting with big ticket items as the readiness to meet the surge of seafarers who will require proficiency and competency certificates, and preparedness for other such emergencies that might render some divisions non-operational for some time. He foresees a merging of internal divisions that handle both convention and non-convention certification and training.

Estaniel also voices out the need for targeting succeeding critical dates and activities for the end of transition period, validity and submission of documents; entreats all concerned on alignment of information; and the leveling up of MARINA and the STCWO with external relevant maritime entities.

And with a final note, he calls that a “pro-active participation” becomes the new STCWO mantra as he expresses the need to refine all the milestones met this 2015 and maximize their functionality by thinking outside the box and taking on a forward-looking culture that can steer the department to even greater heights.

The finale for the team-building activity continues through the night. After all the activities, Deputy Executive Director for STCWO Atty. Jabeth Sena Jepath Dacanay closes with a statement on renewed dedication and great compassion at work with colleagues and the public served as the department faces bigger challenges in 2016.

Attendance of said meet has reached about 300 persons, including division chiefs.

Continuous technical skills enhancement in maritime safety is foremost—Victoria-Bañas

… BECAUSE MARITIME SAFETY IS AN INHERENT ATTRIBUTE IN EVERY SHIP

Maritime safety is a primary attribute every sea-going vessel must possess, according to Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA) Deputy Administrator for Operations Atty. Gloria J. Victoria-Bañas in her inspirational message during the three-day “Training on Ship Stability and Loadline” at the Makati Diamond Residences.

Bañas stresses, “we are committed to continuous technical enhancement and widening of knowledge and skills for all MARINA personnel.” She likewise states her strong support for technical undertakings and acknowledges the sharing of technical expertise the Japanese representatives and resource persons provide for the training.

Training on Ship Stability and Loadline at the Makati Diamond Residences
Meanwhile, Mr. Tomoyuki Fukuhara, MARINA-JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency) Consultant, commends MARINA for initiating the knowledge and skills enhancement training for its technical personnel and looks forward that MARINA disseminates both knowledge and skills gained through the workshop to all relevant entities.

Mr. Takanori Matsumoto from the Hull Department of ClassNK facilitates topics on Intact Stability Criteria, including such subjects as the “Code on Intact Stability 2008” with relevant documents, interpretations, and procedures for implementation. The calculation of trim and stability and damage stability calculation using the PrimeShip-IPCA application, an integrated system for ship performance capability, are largely discussed.

Also, subjects on “Damage Stability Regulation”, the “MARPOL (The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships) Annex 1,” the “International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code),”  the “International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code),” and “Certification and Inspection for Stability” are presented.

Mr. Taise Takamoto, Senior Surveyor of ClassNK, expounds on the topics on the “International Loadline Convention,” loadline surveys, and loadline computation. A workshop on freeboard computation is also delivered under Takamoto.

Training on Ship Stability and Loadline at the Makati Diamond Residences

The training from 09-11 December 2015 is attended by 30 participants from the MARINA central and regional offices: directors, officers-in-charge and technical staff who are mostly naval architects.